WAY BEYOND
GLUTEN FREE

WAY BEYOND
GLUTEN FREE

KEY INGREDIENTS

WATER

A well hydrated body is 70% water. Smartcakes® and Smartbuns® also have water as a key ingredient and not water laden with added chemicals. We use nano filtering systems created by rocket scientists to ensure our water is pure. Better water starts the process for better food. We partnered with a neighboring company to use the best water possible. The Cool Blue® water purifier incorporates three layers of technology to ensure the best tasting and purest water we can use to add to the quality and taste of our products and the nutritional value to you. The system’s three technologies each have their individual strengths, but with one main common advantage. They all retain the beneficial minerals found in healthful drinking waters.

PROTEIN

Smartbuns® have 10 grams of protein per bun and 4 grams of protein per Smartcake®. How do we get all that protein in that serving size? Great, high protein, ingredients. Whey protein isolate is a highly refined, microfiltered protein which is dairy derived, but still considered lactose free. It is a complete, high-quality protein, containing all of the essential amino acids. In addition, it is very digestible, absorbed from the gut quickly compared to other types of protein. Whey protein promotes muscle growth. Muscle mass naturally declines with age. Eggs are another source of protein in our products. Unlike most cereals and yogurt, eggs only contain one ingredient – “eggs.” They don’t contain sugar or carbs, just 6 grams of high quality protein. Eggs contain Choline, which promotes normal cell activity, liver function and the transportation of nutrients throughout the body. What we all are told by diet books about protein being key to weight loss is not only grounded in medical studies, it includes what we really need – to feel satiated.

OLIVE OIL

Olive Oil is another ingredient that serves up good health. According to the Mayo Clinic, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) the main type of fat found in olive oil is considered a healthy dietary fat and may help lower your risk of heart disease by improving related risk factors. For instance, MUFAs have been found to lower total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. In addition, some research shows that MUFAs may benefit insulin levels and blood sugar control, which can be helpful if you have or are at risk of type 2 diabetes.

FLAX

Flax Meal is also a key ingredient in our products and contains Omega-3 essential fatty acids, the “good” fats that have been shown to have heart-healthy effects. It is also rich in fiber as well as lignans, which have both plant estrogen and antioxidant qualities. Flaxseed contains 75 to 800 times more lignans than other plant foods.

GLUTEN FREE

Gluten (derived from the Latin for glue) is a protein composite found in wheat and related grains. It has held the secret to baked goods for centuries. Gluten both holds dough together and provides it with elasticity. Glutens help dough rise and keep its shape and even can give the end result a chewy texture.

Gluten sounds great for bakers. How does gluten affect consumers? Millions of Americans and people all over the world are increasingly showing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and Celiac disease. The culprit? Gluten. That wonderful attribute that makes it glue, does not stop when you eat it. It settles into the small intestine where most of the nutrients from ingested food are absorbed. In people with celiac disease, the body sees gluten fragments as invaders — toxins that shouldn’t be there. When the body attacks these invaders, it also attacks itself, which is why celiac disease is classified as an autoimmune disease. Specifically, the body attacks the villi on the lining of the small intestine. As the villi become “blunted” they are no longer as effective in absorbing nutrients. In some cases, this inability to absorb nutrients may be bad enough to stunt growth and weaken bones. The loss of vitamins and minerals may lead to other problems, such as anemia, osteoporosis, or growth delays in children.

SUGAR FREE

How much sugar is on the label? The average American consumes 130 pounds of added sugars (according to Prevention Magazine) in a year. That’s about 22 teaspoons a day, way over the max set by the American Heart Association. New science shows that this overload of sugar—often stemming from hard-to-detect hidden added sugars—is affecting your body in all sorts of strange ways.

Sugar primes your body for diabetes. And the reality is that heart disease and diabetes are intricately related: Heart disease and stroke are the number one causes of death among people with type 2 diabetes, accounting for 65% of those deaths.And added sugars cause excess insulin in the bloodstream, which takes its toll on your body’s circulatory highway system, your arteries.

Emerging research suggests regularly eating too much sugar scrambles your body’s ability to tell your brain you’re full. Carrying a few extra pounds and living with type 2 diabetes can throw off your body’s ability to properly put off leptin hormones; the hormones that let you know you are full. Another result of too much sugar? Dry, brittle protein fibers that lead to wrinkles and saggy skin.

Science shows it takes just 30 minutes or less to go from a sugar rush to a full-on sugar crash. This sugar spike-and-crash sets you up to want more sugar—a vicious cycle. We might reach for sugar to feel better, but we’re getting the opposite effect in the end.

GLUTEN FREE

Gluten (derived from the Latin for glue) is a protein composite found in wheat and related grains. It has held the secret to baked goods for centuries. Gluten both holds dough together and provides it with elasticity. Glutens help dough rise and keep its shape and even can give the end result a chewy texture.

Gluten sounds great for bakers. How does gluten affect consumers? Millions of Americans and people all over the world are increasingly showing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and Celiac disease. The culprit? Gluten. That wonderful attribute that makes it glue, does not stop when you eat it. It settles into the small intestine where most of the nutrients from ingested food are absorbed. In people with celiac disease, the body sees gluten fragments as invaders — toxins that shouldn’t be there. When the body attacks these invaders, it also attacks itself, which is why celiac disease is classified as an autoimmune disease. Specifically, the body attacks the villi on the lining of the small intestine. As the villi become “blunted” they are no longer as effective in absorbing nutrients. In some cases, this inability to absorb nutrients may be bad enough to stunt growth and weaken bones. The loss of vitamins and minerals may lead to other problems, such as anemia, osteoporosis, or growth delays in children.

SUGAR FREE

How much sugar is on the label? The average American consumes 130 pounds of added sugars (according to Prevention Magazine) in a year. That’s about 22 teaspoons a day, way over the max set by the American Heart Association. New science shows that this overload of sugar—often stemming from hard-to-detect hidden added sugars—is affecting your body in all sorts of strange ways.

Sugar primes your body for diabetes. And the reality is that heart disease and diabetes are intricately related: Heart disease and stroke are the number one causes of death among people with type 2 diabetes, accounting for 65% of those deaths.And added sugars cause excess insulin in the bloodstream, which takes its toll on your body’s circulatory highway system, your arteries.

Emerging research suggests regularly eating too much sugar scrambles your body’s ability to tell your brain you’re full. Carrying a few extra pounds and living with type 2 diabetes can throw off your body’s ability to properly put off leptin hormones; the hormones that let you know you are full. Another result of too much sugar? Dry, brittle protein fibers that lead to wrinkles and saggy skin.

Science shows it takes just 30 minutes or less to go from a sugar rush to a full-on sugar crash. This sugar spike-and-crash sets you up to want more sugar—a vicious cycle. We might reach for sugar to feel better, but we’re getting the opposite effect in the end.